Friday, January 7, 2011

New Interview With Jimmy Moore -- Encore Week!

by Chris Masterjohn

We discuss helpfulness, the scientific method, the importance of credentials, the China Study, a new musical 'ode to Campbell,' raw milk, milk, cooking fat, all fat, guilt by association, uniting wapf and paleo, and more!


Also check out Dr. Robert Lustig, Denise Minger, Dr. Kurt Harris, and Robb Wolf coming soon!

Read more about the author, Chris Masterjohn, PhD, here.

44 comments:

  1. Looking forward to it.

    Jimmy cranks out great interviews faster than I can keep up, but I will definitely be listening to all these encore week interviews.

    The whole week really is the best of the best and it is no coincidence you were included, Chris.

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  2. yah. add in stephan, and maybe chris k, and i think it'd be even more complete. looking forward to the series.

    jack kronk

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  3. Unfortunately, the version on his site not only loads slow, but the last I'm guessing half of it is cut off. I'm currently downloading from ITunes to see if the whole thing is there, but it's downloading very slowly.

    Thanks for the props guys! I agree, Stephan and Chris K would be great.

    Chris

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  4. It'll speed up soon, Chris. My producer updated the podcast first, then my blog, and then my forum. Once all of this is complete, normal download speeds will return and you can hear all of my "Encore Week" 2011 interviews. THANKS for your patience.

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  5. THANKS for all the awesome interviews Jimmy! No problem! Well worth the wait!

    Chris

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  6. Wow it is downloading slowly from iTunes... But I'll persist

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  7. The real, full interview is up! And it downloads quickly!

    Chris

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  8. It's long, but worth listening to of course.

    The Campbell stuff - well, I'm bored with him already ... :-)

    That the WAPF ancestral diet, the low-carb people, and the Paleo people are kind of running in parallel with some of the same themes is a sound observation. But I think Mark Sisson's variant of Paleo - Primal - is probably a bit closer to the other two. Paleo seems a bit *restrictive* to me. I mean - not only does Prof. Cordain want to go gluten-free and dairy free (which is fine and anyone might need to do that even if it's not clear that *everyone* needs to) but he also wants to go low-ish fat and is particularly down on saturated fat. I don't think that's sustainable on the evidence - let alone representative of what *real* Palaeolithic people were eating.

    I think the whole "restriction" business is a curious one. It comes into the WAPF stuff as well. What's good about WAPF is that a lot of stuff is "in" - animal fat, butter, and eggs, for example, are back on the menu. However, caffeinated drinks and foods are out - coffee, tea, and chocolate.

    I think restriction, perhaps surprisingly, has a definite appeal to some people. But for others I think it's a problem: some people are definitely going to say, "Is a piece of bread ... a bit of cheese ... a cup of tea ... whatever" really that much of a problem?" Now I don't think there are any clear answers here and it's hasty to assume that there are. The naysayers may be right, and they may not be - or they may be right for some people some of the time.

    I was slightly surprised to find Chris ate in such a "functionalist" manner. I understand that food has a reference to health, but I also think there are connections to taste, aesthetics, history, culture and, perhaps most importantly, sociability. My impression is that the WAPF, unlike some of the "parallel" movements that are saying somewhat similar things, does "get" this. I mean no personal criticism - I think I may be as guilty myself - i just think there's an issue there. "Functionalism" aside, I think one of the major social changes of recent times is that people don't eat together and on the occasions when they do bolt their food and don't talk much. We have all these labour-saving devices and yet we act is if we're always pushed for time.

    Michael

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  9. Those are good points Mike, but often I am on the go and the purpose is very different from when I am with my family. Different situations call for different foods.

    ‎"But to be honest, the best food is the food that brings you nearer the ones you love." -- John Hawks

    Chris

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  10. On "restriction" I'm looking forward to your piece on cyclic eating.

    I suspect there's much that could be said about the business of restriction in a really thoroughgoing form - i.e., asceticism. That, it seems to me, is something that has had a perennial appeal but that doesn't sit too easily with the way we modern people see things. Maybe self-denial, of any sort, can strengthen the soul, which might not be a bad thing (if done in all humility). But one tends to look at some accounts of the practice and think there's something pathological going on. For example, there's the Byzantine Emperor's wife who eventually de-feminized herself through rigid dietary exclusions. There's maybe an element of self-punishment there. There definitely is in the accounts of the Buddha in his ascetic period where the purpose of the asceticism is to pay off bad "karma". (And it doesn't matter whether these are veridical or not: they catch an attitude prevalent in Iron Age India.)

    Feasting seems like the opposite side of fasting, and I have to wonder whether denial breeds a psychological need to, occasionally, do the opposite (unless, perhaps, one is a very driven person). At the moment I'm reading Ann Hagen's "Anglo-Saxon Food and Drink: Production, Processing, Distribution and Consumption" and was interested, although not surprised, to find that it seems that monks were forgiven for drunkenness on Saints' days. On those days you were expected and supposed to be in a party mood. Mind you, it sounds like monks were often rolling around the cloisters a bit, feast day or not, and considering the daily allowances of drink that's not surprising.

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