Monday, May 2, 2016

The Daily Lipid Podcast Episode 6: Why "Glycation" Is a Bad Reason to Restrict Carbs

15 comments:

  1. Is there a plan to get the podcast added to Stitcher?

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    1. Hi Billy,

      It is already in Stitcher. I now link to the Stitcher page in the show notes for each episode.

      Chris

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  2. Chris, I enjoy the detailed level of biochemistry. Even when I don't follow all of it, it gives me a sense of the context and the bigger picture. It squelches the tendency to over simplify

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  3. The amount of biochemistry is great!

    What I enjoy most, is seeing how very smart people, can deeply analyze and research the same topic and data, yet arrive at very different conclusions! The insulin-obesity model is my favorite.. for example, Peter Attia (former President of NuSI), and Dom D'Agostino both very well credentialed, tout a low-carb ketogenic diet, and have plenty of biochemistry to show..

    http://eatingacademy.com/nutrition/ketosis-advantaged-or-misunderstood-state-part-ii

    On the other end, you have researchers like Stephen Guyenet who aren't so convinced:

    http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2016/01/testing-insulin-model-response-to-dr.html


    Sugar, is also a good one.. Robert Lustic (Bitter Truth fame) say fructose (and by extension HFCS) is metabolized differently than glucose, to promote weight gain. Alan Aragon makes compelling counterpoints:

    http://www.alanaragonblog.com/2010/02/19/a-retrospective-of-the-fructose-alarmism-debate/

    While the smoke settles, any plans for podcast on Intermittent fasting?

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    1. Agreed!

      IF may be on the list. I'll have to think about it. I'm not sure I have anything unique to add about it but if I think of something I'll share.

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  4. Robert ThompsonMay 7, 2016 at 3:54 PM

    Does hemoglobin A1C reflect average blood glucose levels or does it not?

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    1. It is an imperfect measure of culumulative recent hyperglycemia.

      So, yes it does, and no it doesn't.

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  5. How can i know so much as you? What do i need to learn and study?

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    1. The best way to start is to ask more specific questions.

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  6. AWESOME episode! Would love to hear how all this relates to a1c and diabetes. I've also heard a few people talk about how a1c is not as reliable to measure average glucose as we thought and is used in clinical practice. Can we get a glycation part 2?!

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    1. Hi Tracy,

      Good idea! In short, it is useful but confounded by fructosamine 3-kinase activity (deglycates hemoglobin) and by red blood cell turnover (higher rate lowers Hba1c). Also, there is no evidence that Hba1c plays a causal role in diabetes.

      Chris

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    2. YES!!! Let's here more about that!!

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  7. Dr. Masterjohn,

    I'm a big fan of your work, theories and most of all your openess to discuss science from a sort of new point of view.
    After about a year looking for some answers to my high A1C and theorethically high average blood sugar despite a low carb diet, I finally found the answer in this podcast. I was put on a very low carb diet with the aim of reducing my A1C from 5.6 to end up at 6.1 after 6 months . I was told my average blood sugar must be in the 120 mg/dL which; was at all not possible as I was measuring my blood sugar like a freak all day long and never got any value above 110 nor stayed longer than that for more than an hour plus my FBS average was 87-90. My blood lipids were all in the healthy range, still was told I was borderline Type 2 and hypothyroid. In summary, I got worse in a very low carb diet so I did re-introduce carbs again and feel much better. I'm not and was never overweight so, not a problem at all.
    I will continue reading your posts as I'm still intrigued on why or what nutrient deficiencies are behind cases like mine as I've seen many people improving on a very low carb diet. It works but, it is not for every one.
    Thanks for sharing your work with us.
    Mónica

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    1. Monica, thank you for sharing your story. I've heard others like it, and it's not surprising because it has been known for over a half century that carbs increase glucose tolerance and that was the traditional rationale of standardizing carb intake for a couple weeks before a glucose tolerance test. I'm glad you're feeling better.

      Chris

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