Monday, June 20, 2016

The Daily Lipid Podcast Episode 15: You Asked Me Anything About Heart Disease, 06/16/2016


This past Thursday, we all showed up live on Facebook so you could ask me anything about heart disease. Here's the video, and the audio recording as a podcast. 

Don't forget this Saturday at 2:00 PM eastern time you can show up live again to ask me anything about methylation! Here is the full schedule of upcoming Facebook Live events. 

Listen on ITunes or Stitcher.
Click here to stream.
Right-click (control-click on the Mac) here and choose "save as" ("save link as" on Mac) to download.
Subscribe in your own reader using this RSS feed.  


Read on for the shownotes.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Facebook Live! Final Schedule and Themes for Events Coming in the Next Month


Tonight at 8:00 PM eastern time I will be LIVE on Facebook again so you can ask me anything about heart disease. I hope to see you there!

Thank you so much for voting on the themes.

Here is the schedule for the next four events (times are all eastern time, so please make sure to adjust it to your own time zone if needed):
  • Thursday, June 16, 8:00 PM eastern time: Ask Me Anything About Heart Disease
  • Saturday, June 25, 2:00 PM eastern time: Ask Me Anything About Methylation Nutrients (B12, folate, choline, etc)
  • Wednesday, June 29, 5:00 PM eastern time: Ask Me Anything About Vitamins A, D, and K
  • Saturday, July 9, 2:00 PM eastern time: Ask Me Anything About Health, Fitness, and Nutrition (free-for-all like the first episode)
The themes are chosen but the questions aren't. Show up live, and you'll make able to ask the questions that will wind up becoming the show itself!

Monday, June 13, 2016

The Daily Lipid Podcast Episode 14: I Came LIVE On Facebook So YOU Could Ask Me Anything, and THIS Is What Happened!

Chris Masterjohn answere questions about saturated fat, obesity, inflammation, Ray Peat, Andrew Kim, sugar, antioxidants, Brian Peskin, tests for folate status, accidental gluten exposure, fecal IgA testing, protein, muscle mass, longevity, ketosis, carbs, the total-to-HDL-cholesterol ratio and the triglyceride-to-HDL-C ratio.

This past Saturday I went on Facebook Live for the first time ever so you could ask me anything about health, fitness, and nutrition. It was incredible! Thank you to everyone who came and asked questions!

Below you can watch the video or listen to the audio recording as a podcast.



Listen on ITunes or Stitcher.
Click here to stream.
Right-click (control-click on the Mac) here and choose "save as" ("save link as" on Mac) to download.
Subscribe in your own reader using this RSS feed.  


Read on for the show notes.

Friday, June 10, 2016

Start Here for Glycation and AGEs

If you are looking for my writings on glycation and AGEs, you should start with this article:


For a more technical and comprehensive introduction, I recommend chapter 2 of my dissertation. This is not available for free right now (your library should be able to access it, if by no other means by interlibrary loan), but I will try to make that happen in the future.

For the importance of insulin and glucose to protect against AGEs, see my Examine.Com Editorial with the slightly hyperbolic but not ironic title, Sugar is the Ultimate Antioxidant and Insulin Will Make You Younger: Appreciating a Few Poorly Recognized but Critical Contributions of Carbohydrate.
 
For the ability of methylglyoxal, the most important source of AGEs in the body, to contribute to the physiologically important role of glucose production, see We Really Can Make Glucose From Fatty Acids After All! O Textbook, How Thy Biochemistry Hast Deceived Me!

For major problems with the idea that AGEs contribute to disease by binding to the so-called "Receptor for AGEs" (RAGE), see Is the "Receptor for AGEs (RAGE)" Really a Receptor for AGEs?

For major problems with the high-profile papers purporting to measure the "AGE" content of foods, see Is Butter High in AGEs? and The Trouble With Measuring AGEs -- Butter and More

These are my podcasts about glycation:
These are my peer-reviewed articles related to AGEs:

Thursday, June 9, 2016

The Daily Lipid Podcast Episode 13: Wait a Second, Is Glycation Actually GOOD For You?

Methylglyoxal regulates glycolysis in a way that prevents dangerous accumulation of glyceraldehyde, and that conserves glucose during carbohydrate restriction. Its rise on a low-carb Atkins diet makes physiological sense because it conserves glucose and even allows gluconeogenesis from fatty acids. Nevertheless, high methylglyoxal levels causally contribute to diabetes, and this seems to be a stress response that should not be chronically elevated.

In this episode, I wrap up glycation week by discussing why glycation may play essential physiological roles in the body. 

In the early days of methylglyoxal research, Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, who won the 1937 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of vitamin C and critical steps in energy metabolism, saw the molecule as part of a regulatory system. In the early research into glycolysis, the system that converts methylglyoxal to pyruvate was seen as part of energy metabolism. Only later did glycation become synonymous with toxicity.

Current science can be used to make a compelling case that methylglyoxal is normally produced as part of glycolysis to prevent a dangerous buildup of glyceraldehyde and that it rises during carbohydrate restriction to help preserve much-needed glucose and to enable the conversion of fat to additional glucose. This could be seen as an elegant system of regulation and a key part of energy metabolism. 

Nevertheless, it is unclear where the dividing line between physiology and pathology lies, and I see the apparent rise of methylglyoxal during carbohydrate restriction as part of a stress response that should not be chronically activated.

Listen on ITunes or Stitcher.
Click here to stream.
Right-click (control-click on the Mac) here and choose "save as" ("save link as" on Mac) to download.
Subscribe in your own reader using this RSS feed.  


Read on for the show notes.

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

The Daily Lipid Podcast Episode 012: What Is Measuring Our Hba1c REALLY Telling Us About Our Blood Glucose and Diabetes Risk?

Hba1c is confounded not only by red blood cell turnover, but also by the activity of fructosamine 3-kinase (FN3K). Surprisingly, lower Hba1c due to higher FN3K activity could actually mean MORE glycation if your downstream metabolism of 3-deoxyglucosone is not in order.

In response to popular demand, this week is glycation week. In this episode, I discuss the strengths and limitations of using Hba1c to measure our cumulative recent exposure to blood glucose and diabetes risk.

Many people will be familiar with the fact that variation in red blood cell turnover confounds this measurement. Less well known is that variations in the deglycating enzyme fructosamine 3-kinase (FN3K) also confound the measurement. 

Counter-intuitively, if you have a higher rate of this deglycating enzyme but a lower rate of downstream metabolism of 3-deoxyglucosone, your lower Hba1c could actually mean MORE glycation. I conclude that Hba1c is a useful test, but only in the context of a bigger picture put together with more information.

Listen on ITunes or Stitcher.
Click here to stream.
Right-click (control-click on the Mac) here and choose "save as" ("save link as" on Mac) to download.
Subscribe in your own reader using this RSS feed.  


Read on for the show notes.

Monday, June 6, 2016

Beyond Standing Desks: Five More Ways to Work at a Computer Without Ruining Your Posture

Move beyond standing desks. Use yoga asanas as positions to work while gently challenging your mobility, use voice dictation like Dragon for Mac (or Dragon Dictate), and consume Audible books, podcasts, and other auditory information when possible.

 I have a new guest post up at the Paleo f(x) blog:

Beyond Standing Desks: Five More Ways to Work at a Computer Without Ruining Your Posture

It's the top five things I've found most useful to work with information without wrecking my mobility.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

My Appearances as a Guest on Podcasts

Here is a list of all my appearances on podcasts and other online broadcasts

The Daily Lipid Podcast Episode 11: Paleo f(x) Grab Bag: Carbs, Sex Hormones, Type 1 Diabetes, and More

My Paleo f(x) presentation was on using fat-soluble vitamins to optimize sex hormones, but I also discussed the importance of body fat and carbohydrate intake for fertility and in this podcast I also discuss why using a low-carbohydrate diet to treat type 1 diabetes could negatively affect thyroid hormone and sex hormones.

In this episode, I discuss some important insights from my Paleo f(x) talk and audience responses to it, including the potential dangers of treating type 1 diabetes with a low-carb diet, the importance of carbs and body fat for fertility and sex hormones, and why some people might have a great sex hormone profile on a long-term ketogenic diet despite the importance of insulin's contribution to fertility.

I also discuss Headspace meditation, contrast showers, Snapchat, U.S. Wellness Meats liverwurst, Kettle and Fire's upcoming chicken broth and chicken mushroom broth, and my interview with Ben Greenfield.


 
Listen on ITunes or Stitcher.
Click here to stream.
Right-click (control-click on the Mac) here and choose "save as" ("save link as" on Mac) to download.
Subscribe in your own reader using this RSS feed.


Read on for the show notes and relevant links.

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Sugar is the Ultimate Antioxidant and Insulin Will Make You Younger


How carbohydrate and insulin protect against glycation and support the antioxidant defense system.

No, I don't mean that ironically. A little hyperbolic? A little, but not ironic.

This is my new Examine.Com Research Digest Editorial about some underappreciated benefits of glucose and insulin. The Research Digest costs money, but as a member of my audience you can read my editorial and also get a sneak peak at the issue for free. Check it out!